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20121129
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but everybody who signed the pledge including peter king who tried to weasel out of it, shame on him as the new york sun said today. i hope his wife understands the commitments last a little longer than two years or something. the commitment from the pledge -- >> whoa, whoa. hang on. that was a bit below the belt, grover. >> if you think a commitment is not for as long as you make it for, the commitment for the pledge as peter king well knows when he signed it is that as long as you're in congress you won't rain in spending and reform government and rein is taxes. it's only as long as you're in the house or senate. if he stayed too long, that's his problem. you don't tell the bank, oh, the mortgage wasn't that a long time ago? if you make a commitment, you keep it. >> this pledge was first signed in 1986. >> by some people. of course, every two years people often re-sign it. they make statements on it. this is one of the people having doubts just two years ago made a public letter saying he would never support a deal that had any tax increases, only revenues stemming from economic growth and no
is not for life. but everybody who signed the pledge, including peter king who tried to weasel out of it, shame on him as the new york sun said today, i hope his wife understands that commitments last a little longer than, than, than two years or something. >> and zoraida, there you have grover norquist -- >> weeks. >> -- of course, from the americans for tax reform throwing out some pretty strong political hyperbole. but the fact of the matter is, as you said, fiscal cliff, 35 days away, and as we've heard from a lot of economists, if congress can't fix this, then we're in a lot of trouble. we can be heading back into recession. >> mark preston live in washington, d.c. thank you for that. so even if democrats and republicans get a spending deal done in time to steer clear of the fiscal cliff, derer thompson says it won't necessarily cure the economy. the senior editor of "the atlantic" joins us live in the next half hour. he has an interesting perspective. >>> ambassador susan rice heads to capitol hill this morning to mend fences with three republican senators. john mccain, lindsey graham and
to see you, grover. thank you for joining us. you heard lindsey graham a moment ago. peter king talked about saxby chambliss as well. here's what he said. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941 i would have signed -- supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> senator john mccain weighed in as well. here's what he said. i'm sorry. let me read to you what he said. fewer and fewer people are signing this, quote, pledge. do you worry that this pledge is losing its grip on lawmakers? >> look, soledad, as you know, the people making this case, the three -- the two senators and the congressman that were put forward, they all said that two years ago when we were arguing over the debt ceiling limit. so their position hasn't changed. and during the debt ceiling limit we cut spending, we didn't raise taxes. so other republicans did not listen to peter king or these others and say, oh, let's go raise taxes. they're sp
norquist's no tax pledge. one of the latest is republican representative peter king. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941 i would have supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed and the economic situation is different. >> republican senator saxby chambliss said, quote, country is more important than pledges. sorry, americans for tax reform and grover norquist, i'm in and out. it all sounds promising. you know, when it comes to compromise. except senators like lindsey graham didn't exactly say he was now open to raising taxes on the wealthiest americans. he actually said he supports capping deductions and buying down debt. which is different. so the question this morning, how excited should we really be by all of this talk of throwing grover norquist under the bust? under the bus, rather, not the bus. cnn contributor will cain is here along with jason johnson, chief political correspondent and political science professor at h
, saxby chambliss, bob corker and peter king, they've said they're willing to compromise and consider revenue increases to avoid the fiscal clifft. their shift in position has grover norquist vowing to help unseat any republican who breaks his taxpayer protection pledge. the question tonight is whether this is a larger trend or whether republicans are just testing the waters and two men who know about testing the waters, politicking and actually meaning what you say join me now. david frum and james carville, you have been on every side of this. let me start with you though david. republicans talking about raising revenue by closing loopholes. you can get a heck of a lot of revenue that way. is this smart for them r or not? >> republicans are going to be yielding grown, but they have to avoid it under pressure. president has a strong hand. they have to keep their party together. frankly, i think loopholes are the -- so-called loopholes, deductions for home mortgage, at this point, the wrong place to look for new revenue. the place is look is with different kinds of tax sources. not by
maybe we'll break that pledge. take a listen to peter king kongman from new york, a republican. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941 i would have signed a support of declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> king says that he's personally against raising taxes but he said, you know, when it comes to these negotiations everything needs to be on the table. john? >> all right, paul steinhauser down in washington this morning. great to see you. >> 32 minutes past the hour. no bah, humbug, just lots of buying over the weekend. a record $247 million shoppers hit the stores, and the websites right after thanksgiving. the national retail federation saying they also spent more money, this is compared to last year. but will shoppers still be in a spending mood today? because you know today is cyber monday. >> huh. that's why i got out of bed. >> christine romans is here. >> i can't go on about being something else. cyber monday the mad
cantor, saxby chambliss, peter king, lindsey graham and bob corker all saying to some degree or another that they would be willing to step back from it. certainly encouraging, but as you saw in that piece from a while ago from athena, there is still some distance between both sides as the clock winds down. >> and, dan, folks who came from those meetings with the president last week and they say that he in those meetings spoke very generally about the possibility of reforming these entitlement programs, big programs like medicare, medicaid, that type of thing, is the white house willing to put on the table specifics regarding the kinds of reforms in those big, big entitlement programs? >> if so, this is something that is happening behind closed dooshz, and they're not saying so publically. republicans have been looking at the health care reform law since the election time now, during the campaign to try to roll it back, to have it repealed. many attempts there. they were hoping that if they had won the election, that they could have also repealed it then, and now, of course, the presiden
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)